Pure Michigan Wrap-Up

Kayaking in Michigan. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.


By Elizabeth Kinsey

Great Blue Heron on Jordan Lake. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.


Wherever you vacation in Michigan, you’re sure to have a great time. There’s something for everybody. Whether your preference is roughing it, camping with a camper or RV, staying in a motel or renting a cottage, you’ll find a spot that makes you want to start planning a return trip when you have more time.

Michigan bike trail

Michigan’s cities offer inspiration, gardens, theatre, concerts, cultural diversity and many educational opportunities. Nature’s at her best in Michigan, too, with hundreds of campgrounds and miles of bike trails and hiking trails across the state. If you can swing the time for a vacation before or after Annual Conference, be sure to make your plans early. The beauty of Michigan is not a big secret. It’s a favorite vacation spot, a summer home, a delightful return stop for many folks. Those of us who wait all year for those show-stopping Michigan summers don’t stray too far away from June through September. It’s just what we’ve been waiting to experience again. The summer weather is unpredictable in Michigan, so do come prepared with layers.

I sure hope you can play for a while in this beloved state I’ve called home for 62 years. I’ll be here ready to welcome you to Pure Michigan!

Sunset, Grand Rapids. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Lower Northeastern Michigan

Lake Huron Beach. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey


By Elizabeth Kinsey

Although I grew up on the east side of Michigan close to the Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron, it had been a long time since I spent beach time there. What a pleasant surprise I had with hubby Jim and my sister Steph over Labor Day, time on beautiful Lake Huron shores near Au Gres. There is so much beauty on this shore but it’s not as populated as the western shores of Michigan. Life is more relaxed, less congested and more rustic. Towns are farther apart.

Relaxing around a campfire. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Lake Huron is delicious for a swim on a warm summer day, although you’ll want to wear water shoes for the small rocks that make water-walking a challenge. Tiny rentable cabin clusters dot the shore as you head north into Pinconning (don’t pass a cheese shop without a stop), Au Gres, Tawas City, East Tawas, Oscoda and parts even farther north.

Cabins in the Tawas Area. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

One campground is right between the beach and the town of Tawas City. That’s a whole lot of fun without having to move your car! East Tawas also has a state park and a dog beach.

Inner Tubes on Lake Huron

If you’re an early bird, sunrises on Lake Huron are breathtaking and perfect for early morning meditations or long walks on the beach. Bike, hike, kayak, canoe, camp, fish, grill or do what we did on the beach, read, relax, walk, bob on an inner tube in the waves, chat and then find a restaurant for supper. The Lake Huron shoreline has it all!

Lake Huron sunrise. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Insight Interviews with EYN Leaders about the Crisis in Nigeria

Nathan Hosler traveled to Nigeria in late 2016 and spoke with people in the north-east region of Nigeria. The Office of Public Witness has created 3 different versions of these clips for varying audiences.
Overview of the Crisis in Nigeria-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvDjSkJ8OQk
Overview featuring EYN and other leaders-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jf4MfMdI-0
Full-length interviews-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JX-NUMilsyE
Peace,
  Emmy

Workcamp Reflections

Carol at the workcamp

Carol at the workcamp (photo by Pat Krabacher)

by Carol Goss (participant in the January Workcamp in Nigeria)

When I read in the Messenger about Nigerian Workcamps, I knew I wanted to go. As a child I became enamored with Nigeria when my pastor Bob Bowman and his young family left to serve in Nigeria. And then along with many others, my heart went out to the EYN brothers and sisters in their ongoing crisis. But when I read, hard physical labor in a hot climate, I knew that was my  calling.

Scaffolding at the new church (by Carol Goss)

Scaffolding at the new church (by Carol Goss)

And so, 9 of us from the US melded together in our desire to serve. The hard work was present as cinder blocks and pans of concrete passed from ground level up the scaffolding, and the tall gabled ends of the church were completed. But as we were often reminded, it was the relationships that became the most significant experiences.

Sign advertising the new church at Pegi, where many from Chibok have resettled. (photo from Pat Krabacher)

Sign advertising the new church at Pegi, where many from Chibok have resettled (photo from Pat Krabacher)

Here are 4 reflections on my experience:

  1. We went to visit our first IDP, Internally Displaced Persons, camp, children excitedly ran behind our van. As we descended, the children eagerly gathered around us, thirsty for our attention.
Children at the IDP camp (by Carol Goss)

Children at the IDP camp (by Carol Goss)

No toys or planned activities were seen on the site. We were shown a small tin roof school with a few desks. We crowded inside. There was not enough room for all to sit. But the saddest part, there was no longer a teacher at the camp.

Some of our Workcampers visited the adults in their dwellings. I stayed with the children. I started throwing a frisbee but couldn’t get across the concept of forming a large circle. All wanted to be close to me and the frisbee. Soon we broke into groups and the older boys took the frisbee. I began tossing a ball with some others when a noticed a group of toddlers and shy older kids standing alone. I started singing children’s songs with them. The words were primarily sung by me in English, but the motions were shared by everyone.  It was hard to say goodbye to these children.

  1. One day during a break in the physical labor, I began singing songs with the children
    Happy children learning songs (by Carol Goss)

    Happy children learning songs (by Carol Goss)

    close by. To my surprise, it was the mothers, with varying degrees of English, who were anxious to learn the songs. They wanted to sing them with their children and teach them at children’s church activities. We shared many songs.

  2. My repertoire of children’s songs were called upon another day as a group of mothers and children sat under the canopy. After singing many of our songs, we asked the women to teach us one of their songs. We learned it in Hausa and English. “I must go with Jesus anywhere. No matter the roughness of the road. I must go. I must go!” Literally and figuratively, these women have traveled many a rough road.
  1. On our last Sunday, we traveled the hour to worship with our new friends in Pegi.  Sitting within the newly completed block walls with the roof overtop, we unified our voices. Choirs sang and praises were expressed. As I sat, I silently prayed that I could be particularly aware of God in our midst.
Carol and Mary during the last worship service. (photo from Carol Goss)

Carol and Mary during the last worship service. (photo from Carol Goss)

Before long, a young child came and stood near me. I had not seen this child before and wasn’t sure if the child was a boy or girl. Later I learned her name was Mary. There she stood, looking at me. I asked if she wanted to sit on my lap. She did. I retrieved two granola bars I had with me. She ate those as well as finished my water. I put my arms around her and she pulled them tighter. We finished the service                                                                                                 sitting in God’s presence.

The Foodie Entry

By Elizabeth Kinsey

Brethren certainly love to eat! Once while we were staying in Beulah, we did quite a bit of stocking up for winter. I considered it our Food Tour since we love to eat, too.

Cherry Hut in Beulah. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Cherry Hut in Beulah. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

In Traverse City there are many places that specialize in Michigan-made products, especially cherry products. There’s Benjamin Twig’s, the first cherry store in Traverse City. American Spoon Foods, also in Traverse City, has a recipe for turkey chili using their pumpkin chipotle and peach salsa that is just amazing. The Cherry Republic in Traverse City specializes in ALL things cherry; my favorites involve chocolate.

Take your treats on the drive along the Old Mission Peninsula and admire the many orchards. No doubt there will still be sweet cherry stands aplenty and beautiful views with the treat of a lighthouse at the northern tip. In Glen Arbor you’ll find the original Cherry Republic with cherry pit-spitting contests, various cherry ice creams, salsas, chocolate-covered cherries of all kinds. Not sure about the flavors? Then try a sample of each!

Boone Docks. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey

Boone Docks. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey


Eat at the Boone Docks there if you’re really hungry.

Smoked fish is a must in Leland’s Fishtown. It makes for great picnic food. (Bell’s in Mackinaw City has great smoked fish, too!)

Plevas Meats. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Plevas Meats. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Pleva’s Meats in the little town of Cedar is a popular spot if you’re a sausage fan like some folks in our family.

What more could you possibly need to enjoy the shores of Lake Michigan than a picnic of fresh, dried or chocolate-covered cherries, cherry salsa and chips, some smoked fish, cheese from the cheese/winery in Traverse City, and fresh artisan bread with Traverse City (or Mackinaw City/Mackinac Island) fudge for dessert? If it’s rainy, head to The Cherry Hut in Beulah for their reasonable delicious meals and some cherry pie for dessert. What finds! Yum!

Mackinaw City Fudge. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Mackinaw City Fudge. Photo by Elizabeth Kinsey.

Food Distributions Continue

Rev. Yuguda gives food to needy families.

Rev. Yuguda gives food to needy families.

Director of the Nigerian Disaster ministry, Rev. Yuguda Mdurvwa, reports that the team is continuing with food distributions. The following pictures (provided by EYN) are from a distribution near Michika in the village of Munni. Medical assistance was also made available. Violence continues in the regions nearest the Sambisa Forrest where Boko Haram still has a foothold.

 

Thank you for your continued prayers and support.

Medical personnel see patients and give medicines.

Medical personnel see patients and give medicines.

Relief workers unload bags of grain.

Relief workers unload bags of grain.

Women wait in line to receive food supplies.

Women wait in line to receive food supplies.

 

You are here

One Great Hour of Sharing  Photo by Jeffrey Abyei

One Great Hour of Sharing
Photo by Jeffrey Abyei

By Laura Jean Torgerson

“Just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me”(Matthew 25:40).

Paul reminds us that as members of the church, we are so closely connected that we may consider ourselves as parts of one body. The New Testament constantly refers to followers of Jesus, not as Christians, but as a family— brothers and sisters.

Many churches live this out when someone is ill, mourning, or facing difficulty. We show up. We are present with loved ones who are in need. We show love in tangible ways with casseroles and cards, and with hugs and spoken words of prayer. These acts let our brothers and sisters in Christ know that we are present with them. They know they are not alone because we are beside them.

Maybe you have been through diagnosis and treatment, or unimaginable sorrow, and your church—your family—has been there to let you know that you are not forgotten in times of trouble. When someone is with you through difficult times, all their truest words and most loving actions simply declare, “I am here.”

The Bible tells us that God is like us in this way. When one of God’s beloved children suffers, God declares, “I am here.” God hears the cries of the poor and oppressed (Exodus 3:9, Psalm 10:17, 69:33), is near to the brokenhearted (Psalm 34:18), and is near to all who call out to God (Psalm 145:18). The promise that God will be with us is a constant refrain from Genesis to Revelation.

When we see the latest tragedy on the news, we might ask, “Where are you, God?” But we already know the answer—God is present in the midst of those who are hurting.

When Jesus tells the parable of the sheep and the goats (Matthew 25:31-40), he reveals a mystery to us. God is most tangibly present in the world where people hunger, thirst, lack adequate clothing or shelter, and are sick or imprisoned. Christ claims as family members people who suffer and says Christ is so present in them that when you feed the hungry, care for the sick, welcome the stranger—you feed, care for, and welcome Christ.

Not just your fellow Christians, but anyone in need, anywhere in the world—these are your sisters, your brothers, your children. Their needs might seem different than the person you worship with on Sunday, but your tangible gifts declare the same message: “I am here.” By reaching out to those who suffer from natural disasters, war, or systemic poverty, you let them know that they are not forgotten. Even when the need seems far away, by acting together as the body of Christ, we are able to be present for these members of Christ’s family.

You show love with gifts of food. You are present by providing seeds and training for sustainable agriculture. Through medical kits, school supplies, temporary shelters, and safe housing, you show up.

In the midst of suffering, where is God? God is here. Where are you? When you give to One Great Hour of Sharing, you are here.

This theme interpretation was written for the 2017 One Great Hour of Sharing. Find this and other worship resources for the offering at www.brethren.org/oghs or give today at www.brethren.org/giveoghs .

(Read this issue of eBrethren)

Being the church

David Steele speaking with the group at the Atlantic Northeast District Listening Session. Photo by Glenn Riegel

David Steele speaking with the group at the
Atlantic Northeast District Listening Session.
Photo by Glenn Riegel

By David Steele, general secretary

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope”(Romans 15:13).

My first 100 days as general secretary have come and gone. These first weeks have been exhilarating, challenging, and joy-filled. Assessment, questions, review of past board and committee minutes, and many meetings have filled my days. What has been and will continue to be central in my work and ministry has been listening—listening to staff and you, the church. From the hallways and meeting rooms of the General Offices and Brethren Service Center to the listening sessions being held across the denomination, I am learning much. I count it a privilege to meet with you to hear your hopes, passions, and concerns, and I look forward to many more listening opportunities as I continue to schedule listening sessions in other districts.

What am I learning from your sharing? We are passionate about the Church of the Brethren and our common ministries of service, mission, discipleship, and evangelism. Yet, we are also distracted by dwindling numbers and whether we will split over our diverging or opposite views related to human sexuality and same-gender marriage. Many of your hopes have been centered in a desire for unity, reconciliation, and focusing on what unites us. Much of your sharing can be taken at face value; however, for some our desire for unity and staying together are tied to certain outcomes.

The issues we face as a church will not go away. Let’s not kid ourselves. Given our diversity, there is no decision that we can make about a social issue that will satisfy all of us. And when we do make a decision about a social issue, it will likely be replaced by another, and another, and another.

Being the church is messy. It always has been. I have always appreciated the diversity of the church and the opportunities and challenges such diversity offers. In 1 Corinthians 12:12 we read, “The body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body.” Each part of the body is essential and cannot be denied its place in the body. “God arranged the members in the body, each one of them, as he chose” (12:18).

I believe we must work together as one body—the body of Christ—to attend to the issues before us and those that we will face in the future. Our rich diversity provides us the ability to speak to a very complex and diverse world and model another way of living—the way of Jesus. Our working together, despite our differences, is not a denial of our convictions, but an acknowledgment of our conviction that Jesus is central in our lives and that we are part of one body in Christ. Sure, it is easier to seek out and gather with those who think and believe like us, but where would be our sense of smell, sight, ability to walk, to touch? As one dear brother said in one of the listening sessions, “I need those of you calling me to purity equally as much as I need those calling me to grace and compassion.”

As we step into this new year, I am committed to our common struggle together as the body of Christ. In the midst of distractions, it has been most exhilarating in my first 100 days to experience firsthand the tireless efforts of staff and leaders to be the church. Mission work around the globe, disaster response ministries, workcamps for youth, discipleship ministries and working with congregations in efforts of vitality and evangelism, intercultural ministries, church planting coaching and support, and planning for Christian Citizenship Seminar, Young Adult Conference, and Inspiration 2017 (National Older Adult Conference)and the list could go on.

We are called to another way of living, a way that looks much different from the world around us. I invite you to support and join in our mission and ministry—to be the church. Being the church is where our body finds its unity and strength through Jesus.

Learn more about the ministries of the Church of the Brethren at www.brethren.org or support it today at www.brethren.org/give .

(Read this issue of eBrethren)

Education Must Continue – Highlights of 2016 and Prayers for 2017

Paul & Becky Gadzama Directors of EMCI

Paul & Becky Gadzama (on the2  sides)
Directors of EMCI

By Becky Gadzama

Education Must Continue Initiative (EMCI) is so thankful to God for another year.  Our prayer is that , every one of you would  enjoy a very exciting  walk with the Lord through out this new year. We also pray that He will provide ALL your  needs both spiritual and material according  to His  riches in  glory by Christ  Jesus.

2016 was very encouraging for EMCI. Highlights include:

– Graduation of 59 IDP Yola senior class. 85% of whom passed their SSCE exams( SAT) equivalence.

– Efforts to start EMCI school in a maiduguri suburb for Kanuri girls,

– Greater opportunities for the relocation of children from from north east to safe schools in central Nigeria and other southern parts of Nigeria,

Children in Yola classrooms

Children in Yola classrooms

– Gradual stabilization of the Yola and Lassa IDP schools for better future directions and planning.

– One of the chibok girls that have lived with us has started her degree (Accounting ) program in AUN Yola. The other is preparing for her SSCE. Their determinations are very encouraging.

-Amazing donation of nutritious food to EMCI kid by ALL THINGS POSSIBLE. It arrived very timely , at the peak of the food crisis in the Borno camps. Over 14000 kids benefited from it in Maiduguri and 6000 children, orphaned by Boko Haram and Fulani herdsmen violence.

Lassa School

Lassa School

Praise and prayer requests for 2017:

– Thanking God His  provisions in the past years. – that God will continue to bless CoB both financially and materially – peace in Nigeria – freedom and human right in Nigeria – stable school year – EMCI senior students to do well in their SSCE exams this year also. – successful teacher capacity programs – safety as we travel to and fro – God’s blessings so that EMCI can do much more this year. – Good health – more opportunities to impact the lives of children educationally. – Favor for the take off of the Kanuri girls school in Maiduguri. -That the remaining 194 Chibok  girls still in captivity will be home very soon

 

Highway 2

Upper Peninsula straits. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Upper Peninsula straits. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


By Elizabeth Kinsey

I would have to say that my favorite stretch of highway in Michigan is Highway 2 east of St Ignac in the Upper Peninsula, just over the Mackinac Bridge. There are scenic overlooks of the bridge. It’s a long highway, miles where one can get off the road and relax on the beach and in the water. My bladder is over 60, so I can’t stay there as long as I’d like since there are no bathrooms along this stretch of lake, but it’s just so beautiful and clean. There’s such a luxury in the view and the cold clean water. I can’t say enough about this stretch of Michigan! Oh, and you haven’t REALLY experienced the Upper Peninsula of Michigan unless you’ve enjoyed a hot pasty, meaty hot pockets that miners used to tuck in their shirts to keep themselves warm and for lunch deep in the mines later. Lehto’s Pasties is our favorite on Hwy. 2 just a few miles east of St. Ignac. It’s lunch-to-go, find an overlook and………….PERFECTION!