Mackinac Island

Mackinac Island

Mackinac Island


By Elizabeth Kinsey

Tour Mackinac Island by horse carriage

Tour Mackinac Island by horse carriage

I’m sure you’ve heard of Mackinac Island, a Michigan favorite! Well, you CAN get there from here, but you CAN’T drive to do so. Catch a ferry from Mackinaw City or St. Ignace for the short ride. There are no cars allowed on the island. Charming. You can enjoy Mackinac Island many ways. One is to take a carriage tour. These horse-driven tours give oodles of information and show you many sights of the island including the Butterfly House and interesting Arch Rock. Restaurants and beautiful gardens abound on the two main streets and up the hill as well as more shops than you’d care to visit.

Horse carriage on Mackinac Island

Horse carriage on Mackinac Island

The views of the Straits of Mackinac and the Mackinac Bridge are gorgeous. If you’re up to it, take a bike ride around the island. There are plenty of rental spots right off the ferry docks. It’s about eight miles around, all paved. You can make it in an hour, but most likely, you’ll want to take a bit more time so you can get off your bike and dabble your feet in the crystal clear cold water. Ride by horseback! Hike up into the middle of the island or around the island if you choose. Sit on the porch of the Grand Hotel (although that comes at a bit of a price).

Flowers on Mackinac Island

Flowers on Mackinac Island

If you visit Mackinac Island for the day, you’re considered a “fudgie” because few folks leave without a pound or two of Mackinac’s popular delicacy (and maybe a pound or two on the hips from all the free samples!). Summer stays on the island are pricy, but there are plenty of choices in nearby Mackinaw City or St. Ignace. While you’re in St. Ignace, you might like Castle Rock. Hang out with Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox! Head east to Sault Ste Marie, the Soo Locks. Boat tours take you through the locks. Very interesting! Or head north to the Tahquamenon Falls State Park, an Upper Peninsula gem. Hike to your heart’s content. Tour the Quincy Mine in Hancock and see how copper mining was done between 1846 and 1945. At Kitch-Iti-Kipi (The Big Spring) help guide a cable boat over the water that never freezes. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is considered the best place to see in the Upper Peninsula. Head to Munising and sign up for a boat ride with sights you’ll never forget. There’s so much to do, something for everybody!
View of Mackinac Bridge

View of Mackinac Bridge

Free New Castle Chicken Vaccinations for EYN communities (Funded through Nigeria Crisis)

shared by Zakariya Musa

roosterThe EYN Integrated Community Based Development Programme (ICBDP) had an awareness gathering with 30 community leaders on Local Chicken vaccine. The meeting include lecture on the importance of Local Chicken to a community delivered by the HoD EYN Agric Mr. Yakubu Peter. In his lecture Peter stressed that people misunderstood the benefits of Local Chickens which he said are easier to manage than Hybrid chickens.

The advocacy meeting was to inform the communities of the free vaccine to be administered to Kwarhi, Mararraba, Anguwan WarTilli, Anguwa Kafu, Lumba, Kwagwanga, Bakin Rijiya, Jan Lamba, and Plefu wards.

vaccineJoro Yuguda Washebiyanda, who spoke on behalf of the Leaders, appreciated the effort and asked the 30 Ward heads to inform their people and encourage them to come out on the days scheduled for the vaccination. The farmers were asked to try to cage their local birds for New Castle Vaccination on the specified dates when the department staff will meet them from early hours. Eight days (12th to 21st December 2016) were proposed for the vaccination.

Joro Yuguda thanked the sponsors of this project and the Church for reaching them with what he called “grace”. He and also called on the ward heads to go home and do their own part by informing every farmer in the domain. “May God reward you, be free to ask the Agric section of the church if we have any questions” he said.

vaccine-trainingThe Agric Department has served Christian and Muslim Communities for a decade with Agricultural services ranging from seeds, egg, fertilizers, herbicides,  and farming techniques.

The Director of  EYN ICBDP, Rev. James K. Mamza, who on behalf of the EYN President thanked the community leaders for responding to the call, said, “This is just a beginning of such assistance to the community.” He also hinted that the church is planning to promote soya beans production in communities with series of projects they have to change life of farmers being supported by EYN Partners.

Traveling with Markus Gamache

By Deb Ziegler

We have been blessed to host Markus Gamache as he hosted us when visited in Nigeria.  One body in Christ, across the ocean… we have seen and heard each other’s journey and we have been blessed. It was a busy two weeks, we traveled over 2000 miles and spoke in 10 different venues from churches to Colleges.  It was a real treat to be able to hear and watch Markus interact with different audiences across the country.  He has a way of connecting with those he is speaking to and can bring an update of the true happenings in Nigeria to a very personal level.  Here are a few highlights about Markus and our journey with him.

Markus at Postdam Church of the Brethren Southern Ohio District Nigeria Fundraiser

Markus at Postdam Church of the Brethren with Pastor Carl Hill
Southern Ohio District Nigeria Fundraiser

Markus’ journey

Each time I listened to Markus speak to a group or held a conversation in the car I learned a little bit more of his story.  Markus was born into a pagan family.  He was the first boy born to his mother, who was the fourth wife of his father.  He grew up in the bush where each wife had three huts, one for sleeping, one for cooking and one for storing corn and making beer. The father had a hut to himself in the center of the compound.  Markus grew up with many brothers and sisters.  When he was about 7 years old to 10 years old he began going to school where he learned to read the Koran and was learning the Muslim prayers.  His father was a leader in the community and became a Muslim and so his whole family became Muslim. This was when Markus was 13 years old.   Between the age of 10 and 13 Markus and the other boys in his school met a Christian man who told them it would be very difficult to become a Muslim; because if you did not recite the prayers just right they would burn you with a hot poker stick.  Markus decided to become a Christian out of this fear.  When his father decided the family would become Muslim, Markus was kicked out of the house and built a small corn stalk house at the edge of the village.  His mother lived with him until he was 15 years old, when his father required her to return home.  She continued to support him with food placed over the fence.  Currently Markus’ father is deceased and his mother is living in his home as a Muslim.  He has many Muslim friends and family members as well as Christian friends and family members.

Markus with his wife and mother

Markus with his wife and mother

Markus has been working with interfaith relations for years. He has six children, two with his first wife who died of complications of diabetes when the children were 7 and 8 years old.  He then married his current wife Janada and they have four children ages 7, 5, 3 and 6 months old.  Markus works with the EYN church and is the representative from EYN to the Church of the Brethren, USA.  This requires much time and energy away from his family.  He hosts visitors to Nigeria, making many things possible.  He visits both in USA and Germany to continue work for the church.  During the Crisis since 2014 Markus shared he has not slept in his bed.  He has hosted many people in his home, both Muslim and Christian, all running for their lives from Boko Haram.  He lives in a three bedroom home, with one bathroom. He described hosting over 60 people in his home at one point.   Not just of a night or two, but for months.  It was a hard burden… to feed these people.  Little children were everywhere, sometimes defecating and urinating on the floors.  His wife was exhausted and their marriage stressed.   So the interfaith camp at Gurku…was born out of necessity.  The Church of the Brethren and many others have supported its ministry.  Before I get lost in the story of Gurku, let me say that Markus still hosts 20 people in his home and he continues to covet time with his family and his wife. Still giving up his bed for others, he is a servant for sure, with much sacrifice.

Visiting Gurku Interfaith Camp (January 2016)

Visiting Gurku Interfaith Camp (January 2016)

The interfaith camp at Gurku

When our group visited the interfaith camp at Gurku there were 70 families living there, both Muslim and Christians, all displaced by the violence in the Northeast.  They had a church building started and were beginning to build a mosque.  The people worked together to make their own bricks and helped each other build their homes.  They have an infirmary and a brick oven for the widows to bake muffins to sell.  Now there are 170 families living at Gurku.  The widows have their own living area and a fish pond.  They just finished harvesting the fish and smoking them for eating and selling.  The church has been completed with windows and doors, and a tile floor.  They have also built a guest house at the site.  This community is very close to Markus’ heart and in the future he would like to move his family to this community to live and work with them.  He often thinks of a day when he can spend his time raising his family.  Markus will say that he never planned to build an interfaith camp, but out of the need for a place for all the displaced people the community has been developing with support and leadership from many people.

Who are the Boko Haram?

I am no expert, but I have learned in the past two weeks that Boko Haram was born out of poverty, lack of resources, food, and they are fellow Nigerians, brothers and cousins and yes relatives to the people we have met in the EYN.  Nigeria had been suffering from lack of food and a poor economy since 2009.  Somehow Boko Haram has been able to obtain weapons, food and money.  They have ways of employing others to work for them and since the economy is so depressed people will agree to work for them before they even know what they signed up for.  So indeed Boko Haram includes people in each community that are known by members of EYN;  people they have gone to school with, met in the market, and members of their own family.  Markus shared his mother was held by the Boko Haram for nine months. He did not know if she was dead or alive.  Her own grandson came to her numerous times intending to kill her.  And so yes, religious ideology is part of the Boko Haram, but it is also political and economical as well.   As I think of the Chibok girls, I am realizing it is a very complicated situation. It leads me to the scripture Markus was sharing and struggling with on this trip.  “You shall love your enemies, pray for those that hurt you.”   Markus asked us to think about who are our enemies?  Can you name them?  Did Jesus know what Nigeria was going to go through when he said love your enemies?  What should they do when they recognize the man that killed their husband, or slaughtered their baby?  What should you do when you face them in the market?  Markus and others covet our prayers and our wisdom, inspiration and strength to help them to love their enemies because as human beings it is extremely difficult to forgive and love.  I can only suggest that it is the Christ in us that allows us to be able to look upon another person who has harmed us and hurt us so deeply, and to respond with grace, love and forgiveness.  It is not us alone that can forgive and love, but the power of Christ in us that gives us the strength to not retaliate.  Markus challenged people to give to him the wisdom of how to respond to enemies.  He was searching for answers, for strength, for our prayers and support.

Markus in a tractor

Markus in a tractor

Building the Church in Nigeria through a tractor?

Each day of our journey with Markus was filled with moments of deep sharing, wondering and dreaming.  It was good.  It was exhausting.  As we traveled from farm to farm, and drove from Elizabethtown to McPherson College, a dream started to develop in our car.  Markus was learning more and more about farming, preparing the soil, tractors.   And then we started thinking how would a tractor in Nigeria change the ability of the people to plant more crops.  And with each new farm and farmer we met we asked more questions.  We researched tractors in Nigeria, and a proposal began to take shape.  And although it is still only a dream, a possibility, it is exciting to think about building the church in Nigeria with a tractor.  We have learned that Nigeria is the third worst country for famine.  In the northeast and even in the camps closer to the center of the country the people do not have enough food to eat.  People are dying in the camps every week for lack of food.  A tractor would be helpful in preparing the soil for planting.  Right now all farming is done by hand.  In some areas the bush is being tilled for the first time and it is very hard work.  If the tractor could disk the ground, the people could plant more crops and harvest more food.  They would have more food to eat and to share with their neighbors.  They would have seeds to save to plant for the next year.  Some of the crops could be sold and the money used to pay for hospital needs, school fees for their children and placed in the church offering.  Many people are not going to church because they have nothing to give to the offering.  Pastors are not being paid because the people are in crisis and do not have much to give. Over 1600 churches have been burned and destroyed in the northeast.  Pastors are out of work.  We do not even know where some pastors are located presently, dead or alive.  People are settling new areas of Nigeria and the church is growing as host communities join displaced EYN members.   If people had more money to give to the church, they could pay their pastors and have money to rebuild the buildings that were destroyed and build new buildings in new communities.  They would feel good about being about to support their families and community.

Each day I shed tears of compassion for the far reaching effects of crisis.  I learned how complicated counties, people, churches, governments and systems can be.  How overwhelming the needs.  How faithful God’s people are all over the world.  I continue to witness the power of prayer, the faithfulness of God’s mercy.

 

Seeing God at work

MSS volunteer Ruth Ritchie-Moore reading to students at Buffalo Valley Church of the Brethren. Photos by Donita Keister

MSS volunteer Ruth Ritchie-Moore reading
to students at Buffalo Valley Church of the Brethren.
Photos by Donita Keister

By Donita Keister, associate pastor for Children and Pastoral Care at Buffalo Valley (Pa.) Church of the Brethren and Mission and Ministry Board member.

Days are refreshingly cooler now that Fall has finally arrived. This summer in central Pennsylvania was particularly warm, and had a unique sense of warmth for me that went beyond the sun’s intense rays. Each summer at Buffalo Valley Church of the Brethren, I supervise a summer full of programming for children in our community that includes a Wednesday day camp along with other ministry activities. Last fall our Children’s Ministry Team became aware of Ministry Summer Service, a leadership development program during which college students in the Church of the Brethren spend nine weeks in a church-related setting. As we applied to become a site for an MSS volunteer, we looked forward to the extra set of hands and feet that would lighten the heavy load of summer ministry.

We were excited to learn that our application was accepted and we would welcome Ruth Ritchie-Moore into our lives and ministry. As we prepared for her work among us, I slowly gained a deeper understanding of what MSS was all about. Yes, Ruth would be among us as “hands and feet,” but the relationship would go well beyond that to a place of heartfelt ministry on a number of different levels. I learned that I would have the responsibility to mentor Ruth, who had entrusted her summer to my care. Her experience with our congregation would help form her view of her own ministry and call in her chosen vocation.

Ruth and I were partners as we planned our times of ministry with the children. I challenged her to confidently grow in her obvious ability to articulate her particularly deep insights and to share her heart. She challenged me to be organized and prepared for my day (although I’m pretty sure she was not aware of that… I have a tendency to “fly by the seat of my pants” more often than I should). I challenged her to be open to God’s calling in surprising and unexpected places. Her quiet and reflective presence challenged me to “be still and know” daily with more intentionality and presence in order to see God’s hand at work. These lessons and others brought the unique sense of warmth and friendship into our mentor/mentee relationship.

As our time together drew to a close I discovered new things about Ruth that I wished I had seen earlier. I wished for more time at a slower pace, not only so I could mentor her longer, but in order that she could continue to “mentee” me.

Ministry Summer Service is a shared ministry of Youth and Young Adult Ministries and the Office of Ministry. Your gift to the Church of the Brethren supports faith and leadership formation programs like this. Learn more about Ministry Summer Service at www.brethren.org/mss or give now at www.brethren.org/give.

(Read this issue of eBrethren)

Hope in Starting Again – A visit to Yola IDP camp

Contributed by Pat Krabacher

Salamatu Billi singing with the women at the Yola camp

Salamatu Billi singing with the women at the Yola camp

We arrived at the Yola camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDP’s) and Salamatu Billi (wife of the EYN President, Rev. Joel Billi) seemed very happy to be with the women and she joined them in energetically singing warm songs of welcome to our Fellowship Tour. I could not help but wonder how many of the women were widows (as there were noticeably fewer men in the camp). The women’s choir, nonetheless sang with great joy. )

Michelle Gibel and Palace

Michelle Gibbel and Palace

Michele Gibbel of the Litiz, PA church shared the following “take-away” experience: “During the worship/introduction time at the IPD camp in Yola, a young girl named Palace sat on my lap.  She kept playing with my hands, trying to scratch off my freckles, noticing the small blister, and looking at my uneven fingernails.  And then she started to count my fingers.  She touched each one.  And then she touched each of her fingers. 10 – the same number. For me, this moment was so profound.  Our lives could not be any more different.  BUT, we are both created by the same loving God, who has formed each of our fingers, and calls each of us by name.  And so, we are really not that different after all.  My heart will forever remain with my new Little Sister, Palace.” hands

After the welcome singing and the remarks, we toured the camp and saw the sparse living conditions, but the concrete block homes at least were sturdy and permanent. The children were so excited to show Michelle the new water well which seemed to be a symbol of great hope.  We played games and left some mementos of our love (soccer balls, crayons and paper, Frisbees, etc.) with the camp director, Rev. Jerry Tizhe.)

Children around the well

Children around the well

 

Visit Crystal Lake

By Elizabeth Kinsey

Crystal Lake Resort sign

Crystal Lake Resort sign. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Jim and I have spent summer time on Crystal Lake at the Crystal Lake Motel and Resort for decades. Sometimes we’re there for a week. Other summers we spend just a few nights. There are numerous places to stay in the area, but this is our favorite. Crystal Lake in Beulah is about two hours north of Grand Rapids. M31 makes a great drive through several lake towns, though you’re inland a on that route. We love Beulah because it is centrally located for so many of Michigan’s treasures. Once in Beulah, take M22 up to quaint Leland, summery Sutton’s Bay, then on to Traverse City and back. You can head to Frankfurt, the beach, the lighthouse, charming Main Street. Drive to Sleeping Bear sand dunes; appreciate the scenes overlooking Lake Michigan. Climb the bear if you’re inclined. Visit Point Betsy Lighthouse.

Crystal Lake Beach

Crystal Lake Beach. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

Gwen Frostic welcome

Welcome at the Gwen Frostic studio. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Near Beulah is the studio of the late artist Gwen Frostic, a Michigan icon. Pick up beautiful block print stationery, napkins, cards and books of poetry by the artist. See the printing press. Across the road stop at an interesting alpaca farm.
Gwen Frostic studio

Gwen Frostic studio. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


Gwen Frostic cards.

Gwen Frostic cards. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Crystal Lake itself is a clear blue relaxing beauty. It’s perfect for swimming. If you’re up for more of a challenge a more refreshing dip, Lake Michigan beaches abound in that area. You can tube/canoe/kayak rivers, enjoy freshwater fish and ice cream, hike, whatever your heart desires in this Michigan goldmine. Just make sure you’re outside every sunset to enjoy the masterpieces of our favorite Artist!

Crystal Lake sunset

Crystal Lake sunset. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

Things to see in Michigan

By Elizabeth Kinsey

There are many unique things to see in Michigan. Enjoy the Lake Michigan shoreline as you head north.

Lake Michigan overlook

Lake Michigan overlook. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

One of my favorite attractions is the mushroom houses of Earl Young in classy Charlevoix about three hours north of Grand Rapids right on Lake Michigan and Lake Charlevoix. You can take a boat ride on beautiful Lake Charlevoix and see a mushroom house or two, and you can get the map on-line and drive by several. They are so interesting.

Charlevoix waterfront

Charlevoix waterfront. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Visit Castle Farms near Charlevoix. This mansion was constructed in 1918 by Albert Loeb who was the Vice President of Sears, Roebuck and Company. There’s quite a tale of ownership as it passed hands over the decades, even becoming a concert venue which didn’t go over very well with the locals, before being restored to its original beauty. Although it is currently an events venue, there is an informative AM tour to enjoy with a small museum. Look at many items from the early days of the Sear, Roebuck catalogue, a walk down Memory Lane. See posters advertising the variety of musicians who graced the stages. Some of them attracted such a wild audience that Charlevoix’s tiny upscale hospital emergency room had more than it could handle at the end of particularly wild concerts. The gardens are absolutely beautiful, especially in July and August!

Lavender Hill Farm

Lavender Hill Farm. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


When we drove around Lake Charlevoix, we found a treat, Lavender Hill Farm out in the country, a Boyne City address. Who can resist lavender? Their little shop has everything from stationery and dishcloths to lavender sugar and oils. Hmmmm! I can still smell that soothing aroma. For a short-cut across Lake Charlevoix, take the little Ironton Ferry. It’s a quaint way to find your way to the other side. Charlevoix is a Michigan gem that’s sure to please.

Humbled by an Onion

Deb and Dale Ziegler

Deb and Dale Ziegler

By Deb Ziegler                                            While interviewing a family at Masaka, an internally displaced persons care center in Nigeria, I learned about the needs of one father.  I asked him what his needs are.  He said he would like his children to go to school and he needs a job.  I asked what he did for a job before and he said he grew onions and sold them.  Now my face and my heart demonstrated compassion as I processed this information.  But my mind was thinking:  I saw many people selling onions along the road, who would buy your onions?  Everyone around you is in crisis, who has money to buy your onions?  These were my thoughts at the           moment.

I also learned about the people returning to their homes in the northeast.  They needed to plant their gardens kilometers  away from the village for the safety of the village.  The military could not protect them if the corn fields are close to the houses, because they can not see the enemy approaching.  I grow all my own vegetables for the year in my garden. This summer as  I worked each morning weeding and harvesting, often in the  company of my neighbor, I prayed for my Nigerian brothers and sisters.  I was thankful for peacefulness of my garden, listening to birds singing and often watching the sun rise.  Thankful I did not have to look over my shoulder to see if I was safe.   And each week as I heard of people in Nigeria being slaughtered as they tended their garden,  I was brought to tears. Random weekly attacks, stealing produce, burning crops as I peacefully filled my pantry for the coming winter.

a market scene in Nigeria where onions could be sold.

A market scene in Nigeria where onions could be sold.

I harvested my onions and remembered the father who needed a job selling onions to support his family.  I used my last onion one day in October and I just started to laugh….Who would buy your onions I thought…I would…. From now til next August.  A few weeks later I was frying up some of my store bought onions, while also cleaning out the refrigerator.  I was feeling rather sad about the spoiled  food I was throwing away, thinking about Nigeria and the people starving to death each week, when I smelled the burning onions.  CRAP,                                                                                         now I need to buy another one of your onions!                                                                Once again I was humbled by an onion.

Trauma is personal. . . .

Pat Krabacher and Dr. Rebecca Samuel Dali

Pat Krabacher and Dr. Rebecca Samuel Dali

Contributed by Pat Krabacher -Pictures by team members

As we shared our Thursday morning breakfast we didn’t know that we would enter into the deep trauma of someone we cared deeply for, Joshua Ishaya. There is a saying by “Daniele Bernock, “Trauma is personal. It does not disappear if it is not validated. When it is ignored or invalidated the silent screams continue internally heard only by the one held captive. When someone enters the pain and hears the screams, healing can begin.”  Danielle Bernock, (author of Emerging with Wings: A True Story of Lies, Pain, and the Love That Heals)

Riding in the van to the Favored Sisters Christian Fellowship School, Joshua Ishaya, our EYN Fellowship Tour assistant, told us his story of trauma from recurring threats of attack and unimaginable violence he had experienced. First, the months of threatened attacks leading up to the BH attack on Oct. 29th 2014 at his alma mater, Kulp Bible School, Kwarhi/Mubi in Adamawa state. Joshua ran for his life on foot across rugged terrain, witnessing a friend dead in his car and hearing the gun shot and bombs all around him, arriving barefoot in a small village where help was received.

Joshua at Favored Sisters School

Joshua at Favored Sisters School

Four months later in Feb 2015, Joshua traveled from Jos to Kano by bus to stay with his sister. The bus arrived in Kano just before 3 pm, but because 3pm is the Muslim prayer time, the bus was not allowed to pass in front of the Kano Central Mosque which holds 5,000 worshipers. Three blasts went off at the Kano Central Mosque in close succession and Joshua saw bodies, body parts, and blood everywhere, as their bus was very near the Mosque. The images of death and destruction are still vivid in his mind 20 months later. The terror of retribution that was directed to Joshua as one of the few Christians in the vicinity of the Mosque was terrifying. For days, Joshua could not eat, sleep, or even write his name. He cried for hours once safe with his sister in Kano.

Four months later, in June 2015, Joshua was asked to help out at FSCF with the traumatized orphans. Their first day together, all the children could do was cry and Joshua also cried with them. On the second day he realized that he had to do something different so he began taking pictures of the children with his cell phone. They were desperate to see their own picture, so Joshua used his laptop to put the pictures into PowerPoint and show the children their pictures. Slowly the crying ended and a few small smiles emerged. Over the next two months Joshua entered the pain of the orphans and heard their silent screams, healing was beginning for many children.

Katie Ulm with the children

Katie Ulm with the children

One year later, Joshua and our FT visit to FSCF in Aug 2016 –  like a sweet reunion for many of the orphan children as there was great joy at seeing Joshua when we arrived! Our FT Visit to FSCF Orphanage & School started with sweet singing by the orphan children living at the school over the summer break. They sat in plastic chairs and seemed hesitant or unable to smile. Playing games, teaching how to throw a Frisbee, a quick football (soccer) game, painting popsicle sticks, drawing pictures, or just talking with and taking more pictures of John, Eve, Jason, Joy, Rahila, Sarah, Mary, Susan, Israel, Yuku, Vilto, and the many others was the order of the afternoon.  A simple visit that says to an orphan, ”You are important and loved, we came to see you.”,  seemed to bring more healing to the orphans and changed us as we shared in their pain. Before leaving we honored the FSCF Asst. Director and pastor Balla with the teal “We are one body in Christ shirts” for the great love that FSCF is extending in Jesus’ name to these EYN orphans. Pray for the many orphans in NE Nigeria. God is using Joshua’s deep trauma for His glory – Joshua has a calling into Youth Ministry – Praise God!

Adam Ulm with the orphans

Adam Ulm with the orphans

Take-Away Thought – Trauma is personal. . . . When someone enters the pain and hears the scream,s healing can begin. In a small way, the FT entered into the pain of Joshua and of the children at FSCF orphanage so hope and healing are taking place. We are family, the body of Christ, united in love. When our family suffers, we come together to be present and to love one another. As Zander Willowby  observed in his blog dtd 22 Jul 2016,  “A church is people stuck together by love.” http://blog.brethren.org/2016/a-church-is-people-stuck-together-by-love/

 

 

Things to see and do near Grand Rapids

By Elizabeth Kinsey

Right in the middle of the Michigan mitten near and in Grand Rapids, site of the 2017 Annual Conference, there are plenty of things to see and do. The Gerald R. Ford Museum is in the heart of downtown Grand Rapids. It’s an interesting walk through Ford’s presidency.

Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum

Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Berries at farmers market

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey


A mile or so from that is the Fuller/Fulton Street Farm Market, open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Where but in Michigan can you buy fresh Michigan strawberries, raspberries, famous Michigan sweet cherries, early blueberries, and maybe even a few early cling peaches and so much more? Throw in artisan bread and cheese and you’ve got most of a picnic to eat along the Grand River back at Annual Conference.
Blueberries and peaches

Fruit at the farmers market. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


Check the fresh market downtown for ethnic foods galore. I haven’t been there, but Joanna Willoughby can give you enticing suggestions for good eats there.
art prize

ArtPrize work. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey


Check around for remnants of the Grand Rapids ArtPrize, another reason to come BACK to Michigan in late September to early October. It’s when hundreds of thousands of folks enjoy art from around the country, on display all over Grand Rapids for two weeks every year.
A few miles from downtown, you won’t want to miss the award-winning Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park. There’s so much to see, even a little tram that will chauffeur you around in comfort. The Japanese gardens are especially popular there, I’m told! The sculptures are unique as well.
sculpture garden

Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park. Image courtey of Elizabeth Kinsey.