Highway 2

Upper Peninsula straits. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Upper Peninsula straits. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


By Elizabeth Kinsey

I would have to say that my favorite stretch of highway in Michigan is Highway 2 east of St Ignac in the Upper Peninsula, just over the Mackinac Bridge. There are scenic overlooks of the bridge. It’s a long highway, miles where one can get off the road and relax on the beach and in the water. My bladder is over 60, so I can’t stay there as long as I’d like since there are no bathrooms along this stretch of lake, but it’s just so beautiful and clean. There’s such a luxury in the view and the cold clean water. I can’t say enough about this stretch of Michigan! Oh, and you haven’t REALLY experienced the Upper Peninsula of Michigan unless you’ve enjoyed a hot pasty, meaty hot pockets that miners used to tuck in their shirts to keep themselves warm and for lunch deep in the mines later. Lehto’s Pasties is our favorite on Hwy. 2 just a few miles east of St. Ignac. It’s lunch-to-go, find an overlook and………….PERFECTION!

Mackinac Island

Mackinac Island

Mackinac Island


By Elizabeth Kinsey

Tour Mackinac Island by horse carriage

Tour Mackinac Island by horse carriage

I’m sure you’ve heard of Mackinac Island, a Michigan favorite! Well, you CAN get there from here, but you CAN’T drive to do so. Catch a ferry from Mackinaw City or St. Ignace for the short ride. There are no cars allowed on the island. Charming. You can enjoy Mackinac Island many ways. One is to take a carriage tour. These horse-driven tours give oodles of information and show you many sights of the island including the Butterfly House and interesting Arch Rock. Restaurants and beautiful gardens abound on the two main streets and up the hill as well as more shops than you’d care to visit.

Horse carriage on Mackinac Island

Horse carriage on Mackinac Island

The views of the Straits of Mackinac and the Mackinac Bridge are gorgeous. If you’re up to it, take a bike ride around the island. There are plenty of rental spots right off the ferry docks. It’s about eight miles around, all paved. You can make it in an hour, but most likely, you’ll want to take a bit more time so you can get off your bike and dabble your feet in the crystal clear cold water. Ride by horseback! Hike up into the middle of the island or around the island if you choose. Sit on the porch of the Grand Hotel (although that comes at a bit of a price).

Flowers on Mackinac Island

Flowers on Mackinac Island

If you visit Mackinac Island for the day, you’re considered a “fudgie” because few folks leave without a pound or two of Mackinac’s popular delicacy (and maybe a pound or two on the hips from all the free samples!). Summer stays on the island are pricy, but there are plenty of choices in nearby Mackinaw City or St. Ignace. While you’re in St. Ignace, you might like Castle Rock. Hang out with Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox! Head east to Sault Ste Marie, the Soo Locks. Boat tours take you through the locks. Very interesting! Or head north to the Tahquamenon Falls State Park, an Upper Peninsula gem. Hike to your heart’s content. Tour the Quincy Mine in Hancock and see how copper mining was done between 1846 and 1945. At Kitch-Iti-Kipi (The Big Spring) help guide a cable boat over the water that never freezes. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is considered the best place to see in the Upper Peninsula. Head to Munising and sign up for a boat ride with sights you’ll never forget. There’s so much to do, something for everybody!
View of Mackinac Bridge

View of Mackinac Bridge

Visit Crystal Lake

By Elizabeth Kinsey

Crystal Lake Resort sign

Crystal Lake Resort sign. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Jim and I have spent summer time on Crystal Lake at the Crystal Lake Motel and Resort for decades. Sometimes we’re there for a week. Other summers we spend just a few nights. There are numerous places to stay in the area, but this is our favorite. Crystal Lake in Beulah is about two hours north of Grand Rapids. M31 makes a great drive through several lake towns, though you’re inland a on that route. We love Beulah because it is centrally located for so many of Michigan’s treasures. Once in Beulah, take M22 up to quaint Leland, summery Sutton’s Bay, then on to Traverse City and back. You can head to Frankfurt, the beach, the lighthouse, charming Main Street. Drive to Sleeping Bear sand dunes; appreciate the scenes overlooking Lake Michigan. Climb the bear if you’re inclined. Visit Point Betsy Lighthouse.

Crystal Lake Beach

Crystal Lake Beach. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

Gwen Frostic welcome

Welcome at the Gwen Frostic studio. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Near Beulah is the studio of the late artist Gwen Frostic, a Michigan icon. Pick up beautiful block print stationery, napkins, cards and books of poetry by the artist. See the printing press. Across the road stop at an interesting alpaca farm.
Gwen Frostic studio

Gwen Frostic studio. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


Gwen Frostic cards.

Gwen Frostic cards. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Crystal Lake itself is a clear blue relaxing beauty. It’s perfect for swimming. If you’re up for more of a challenge a more refreshing dip, Lake Michigan beaches abound in that area. You can tube/canoe/kayak rivers, enjoy freshwater fish and ice cream, hike, whatever your heart desires in this Michigan goldmine. Just make sure you’re outside every sunset to enjoy the masterpieces of our favorite Artist!

Crystal Lake sunset

Crystal Lake sunset. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

Things to see in Michigan

By Elizabeth Kinsey

There are many unique things to see in Michigan. Enjoy the Lake Michigan shoreline as you head north.

Lake Michigan overlook

Lake Michigan overlook. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

One of my favorite attractions is the mushroom houses of Earl Young in classy Charlevoix about three hours north of Grand Rapids right on Lake Michigan and Lake Charlevoix. You can take a boat ride on beautiful Lake Charlevoix and see a mushroom house or two, and you can get the map on-line and drive by several. They are so interesting.

Charlevoix waterfront

Charlevoix waterfront. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Visit Castle Farms near Charlevoix. This mansion was constructed in 1918 by Albert Loeb who was the Vice President of Sears, Roebuck and Company. There’s quite a tale of ownership as it passed hands over the decades, even becoming a concert venue which didn’t go over very well with the locals, before being restored to its original beauty. Although it is currently an events venue, there is an informative AM tour to enjoy with a small museum. Look at many items from the early days of the Sear, Roebuck catalogue, a walk down Memory Lane. See posters advertising the variety of musicians who graced the stages. Some of them attracted such a wild audience that Charlevoix’s tiny upscale hospital emergency room had more than it could handle at the end of particularly wild concerts. The gardens are absolutely beautiful, especially in July and August!

Lavender Hill Farm

Lavender Hill Farm. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


When we drove around Lake Charlevoix, we found a treat, Lavender Hill Farm out in the country, a Boyne City address. Who can resist lavender? Their little shop has everything from stationery and dishcloths to lavender sugar and oils. Hmmmm! I can still smell that soothing aroma. For a short-cut across Lake Charlevoix, take the little Ironton Ferry. It’s a quaint way to find your way to the other side. Charlevoix is a Michigan gem that’s sure to please.

Things to see and do near Grand Rapids

By Elizabeth Kinsey

Right in the middle of the Michigan mitten near and in Grand Rapids, site of the 2017 Annual Conference, there are plenty of things to see and do. The Gerald R. Ford Museum is in the heart of downtown Grand Rapids. It’s an interesting walk through Ford’s presidency.

Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum

Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Berries at farmers market

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey


A mile or so from that is the Fuller/Fulton Street Farm Market, open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Where but in Michigan can you buy fresh Michigan strawberries, raspberries, famous Michigan sweet cherries, early blueberries, and maybe even a few early cling peaches and so much more? Throw in artisan bread and cheese and you’ve got most of a picnic to eat along the Grand River back at Annual Conference.
Blueberries and peaches

Fruit at the farmers market. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey.


Check the fresh market downtown for ethnic foods galore. I haven’t been there, but Joanna Willoughby can give you enticing suggestions for good eats there.
art prize

ArtPrize work. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey


Check around for remnants of the Grand Rapids ArtPrize, another reason to come BACK to Michigan in late September to early October. It’s when hundreds of thousands of folks enjoy art from around the country, on display all over Grand Rapids for two weeks every year.
A few miles from downtown, you won’t want to miss the award-winning Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park. There’s so much to see, even a little tram that will chauffeur you around in comfort. The Japanese gardens are especially popular there, I’m told! The sculptures are unique as well.
sculpture garden

Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park. Image courtey of Elizabeth Kinsey.

Beaches near Grand Rapids

shoreline

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey


By Elizabeth Kinsey

So…you’re coming to Michigan for Annual Conference? You will certainly want to make a vacation out of it! I’ve lived in Michigan all my life; it’s a treasure. I’ll share a few spots I’ve visited recently that you might like to try with your family. Any other Michiganders will be glad to give you their favorite spots, too! You won’t regret spending an extra week or two in beautiful Michigan!

Yacht

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

Within an hour of Grand Rapids, there are many beaches to enjoy. My favorite is Oval Beach across the river and over the dunes from Saugatuck. It is easily accessible, especially if you get there in the morning. On the north end there’s even a boardwalk to the water for those who have mobility challenges. Beach walking is a pleasure. Swimming is a joy with Lake Michigan’s sandy bottom. Watch for waves and rip currents on wilder days, but there are plenty of days of calm. It’s a city park, $8 to use it.

paddlewheel boat

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

State parks are more for the day, but worth it! Closer to Grand Rapids there’s Holland State Park, Tunnel Park in Holland, and Grand Haven State Park is great, too. In Grand Haven and Holland you can walk long piers. From Grand Haven State Park you can walk along the channel of the Grand River, walk into town and have access to great food and creamy treats. These are just three of the beaches I love near Grand Rapids.

sculpture

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Kinsey

Shopping Saugatuck, Holland and Grand Haven are sure to please if the weather doesn’t cooperate, especially because they are such artistic communities.

Grandparents’ Prayer

Grandmother baking with grandson

Photo by Donna Cosmato


Holy God, Eternal Parent, Author of love and grace, we pray for grandparents, great grandparents and all who stand in the line of generations.

Thank you for the blessed gift of children to love and cherish. Thank you for grandchildren and great grandchildren who will carry forgiveness and love into the future, who see your blessed presence in the lives of the least of these among us and who raise up the banner of hope in a hopeless world.

As you, in the model of the Savior, showed us agapé love, seventy times seven forgiveness and going to the cross because of that love, we pray for all grandparents that agape’ love remains a lifestyle, a normal mode of living among all your children of every race and nation.

Forgive us our trespasses, sins and debts when we rely on threats and violence to, in our minds, correct those around us. Grant us the grace of discovery finding peaceful modes to carry the forgiving cross for those we may not like, agree with or appreciate.

On this precious Grandparents’ Day, transform us into people who preach and practice using the heavenly peacemaking ministries you’ve given us. Remake our minds, in old age, remodeling them into fit vessels for the new wine flowing from your New Jerusalem. Grant us grace to support and join the march our grandchildren are walking. Help us celebrate the new day and new life promised in Jesus, your Son, our Savior.

We praise the one who gave us new birth and renews us every day as we pass on the Good News stories of your magnificent grace. Give us ears to hear the language of that Good News as our grandchildren are telling it, bringing us to rejoicing in your ever-living new wine presence among us.

We pray this in Jesus name, promising to take seriously the saving grace and ministry of being faith-filled grandparents. Amen!

J. Lyle (Jim) Kinsey is grandfather to 4 wonderful young women

Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies

cranberry oatmeal cookies

Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies


It’s National Cookie Day and you still have leftover cranberry sauce in the refrigerator from Thanksgiving. Make everyone happy with these treats!

Note: if you don’t have 1 ½ cups cranberry sauce, you can use one cup and throw in some dried cranberries. Or you can probably make the cookies with 1 cup. I think this is just what I had left when I made up the recipe!

Second note: My leftover cranberry sauce was made with real berries. I do not know what would happen if you use the canned stuff with the lines in it. Leave a note and let us know if you try it!

Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies
(Makes around 4 dozen)

Cream together ½ cup butter (one stick) with 1 cup brown sugar.

Add 2 beaten eggs (or, if you’re like me and just made a pavlova for someone’s birthday, three egg yolks)

Stir in 1 ½ cups leftover cranberry sauce

In a large measuring cup, mix 1 ½ cups flour (part whole wheat is fine) with 1 teaspoon baking soda, ½ teaspoon salt and 1 heaping teaspoon cinnamon.

Add to the liquid mixture. Then mix in 3 cups of uncooked oatmeal (I use rolled oats, but I imagine quick oats would be okay, too. The cookies would be a little less chewy, presumably.)

Drop generous tablespoons of dough onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake at 350 F for 10-12 minutes. Cool one minute on the cookie sheet and then on a wire rack.

Heard in my kitchen: “They have oatmeal; I’m calling this breakfast!”

You can find many delicious cookie recipes in the New Inglenook Cookbook, which is a wonderful Christmas gift!

When “IT” Makes the News

By Gimbiya Kettering

I’ll admit, the news story about Jamar Clark has not been on my radar. I have been caught up in the pre-pre holiday business, local meetings, life with a toddler who now takes off her socks as I look for her gloves and her gloves while I am fastening her shoes. The news beyond my front door seems far away. In the midst of my own life, I can lull myself into thinking that the wider world has calmed down, become more reasonable, more sane, more sustainable. That something like peace has descended.

Of course, the reality is much more complicated and the lives of brothers and sisters around the country continue to be disrupted by oppression, poverty, racism, and violence. And in the case of Jamar Clark –ended. The protestors in Minneapolis were paying attention and came out to raise the national awareness about what happened – of the disturbing patterns that continue to happen around the country. They are protesting to raise the awareness of people like me – caught up in our own lives but who would also want to know, who want to be the type of person who pays attention and cares.

Protests are a way of raising awareness, as news reports carry the information into the homes of those of us who aren’t making it through our front doors and into the communities where protests are happening. Yet, the news that someone (it is not clear yet who) has fired on the protestors is frightening. It flies in the face of our American traditions of gathering together as part of raising national awareness that encompass movements from the Boston Tea Party of 1773 and the March on Selma in 1965 –and the public witness of our church such as the On Earth Peace tradition of having a “Peace Walk” at Annual Conference and International Day of Prayer for Peace celebrated by many congregations.

That someone – regardless of who – opened fire on the group is very disturbing. Thankfully, no one has died. However, the act of violence is horrific. And it calls us to ask what is our response as a people of a faith? As a church? As a people of peace?

After Amen

By Gimbiya Kettering

After tragedy comes prayer. What comes after prayer?

Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. —Romans 8:26 (KJV)
For the past month, people have shared articles and essays and online photo albums with me on every possible social media platform about the shootings, about the shooter, about South Carolina’s flag, and about the complicated, terrible story of race in our country. I have been grateful for every day that has passed in peace—without protests turning violent and self-destructive. I have stopped mid-step to listen to the radio reports about Charleston. I have read articles and editorials and tweets but I have not known what to say.For the past month, I have been praying—or trying to pray for the grieving families of those killed, the congregation of Emanuel AME Church, for the people of Charleston, the leaders of South Carolina, for the wider African Methodist Episcopal denomination, for all of us as Americans. Often words have failed me in the rising tide of my grief, rage, and confusion. I have wanted, perhaps more than anything, to be able to push back time. But I cannot continue to pray for a return to the week before last week, before any of this happened, and to pray for something different. That is not the type of intercession God does.

I may never find the words for the prayers that I want to articulate. But, in my silence, I am also preparing for the strength and courage for the actions I need to take next week and the week after that. The actions that will make a difference.

What have you done or said in response to the shootings at the Emanuel AME Church?

How have people received your contributions?

What actions do you think we could take as individuals, as congregations, and as a denomination to be part of the healing after these shootings and other incidents of racialized violence in our community?

Please share your stories so that they can inspire me and others who are seeking a ways forward in our broken, beautiful world. You can send your stories to gkettering@brethren.org or call me at 1-80-323-8039 xt 387.

Gimbiya Kettering is the director of Intercultural Ministries — and this blog series is a way of continuing the conversation about how race, culture, ethnicity, and language impact our relationships with one another and how we do ministry. If you have a question or comment to share, please email her directly at gkettering@brethren.org. More about Intercultural Ministries at:www.brethren.org/intercultural